It happened in the Mearns

This photo, which featured in the Mearns Leader in February 1992, shows the footbridge over the River Carron being put in place, during the construction of the boardwalk linking Stonehaven harbour to the promenade.
This photo, which featured in the Mearns Leader in February 1992, shows the footbridge over the River Carron being put in place, during the construction of the boardwalk linking Stonehaven harbour to the promenade.
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We take a look back at what was making the headlines locally on this week in 1992, 1967 and 1917.

25 YEARS AGO

The view looking from Stonehaven beach up the river Carron.

The view looking from Stonehaven beach up the river Carron.

Friday, March 6th, 1992

A public meeting in Stonehaven on Monday unanimously rejected a Scottish Office proposal to close the central reservation access at the Spurryhillock junction of the A92 Stonehaven bypass, and create a flyover using Broomhill Bridge and existing roads.

And an action group is to be formed, under the auspices of Stonehaven and District Community Council, to campaign for the building of a fully-fledged £3 million flyover at the notorious “accident blackspot”, complete with roundabouts and slip roads on either side.

More than 150 people packed into Mackie Academy’s Assembley Hall for the meeting, which was called by Kincardine/Deeside MP, Nicol Stephen, in the wake of public outcry against the plan put forward by the Scottish Development Department - a division of the Scottish Office.

Detailing the junction’s history, which includes three fatal accidents (four deaths) and a steady stream of serious accidents since the bypass opened in 1984, Deputy roads director for Grampian Regional Council, John Maxwell, described the Spurryhilock junction as “the most dangerous junction in Grampian”.

Many people were angry that both Portlethen and Newtonhill, which were substantially smaller communities, had proper flyovers, while Stonehaven was being offered a “cheap fix”.

50 YEARS AGO

Friday March 10th, 1967

Stonehaven solicitor Mr W. B. Agnew, representing 73 local objectors, appealed to the commissioner at a public enquiry at Stonehaven on Monday to “sweep away” a proposal to build a motel at the north end of Stonehaven which, he claimed, would be an eyesore on the landscape. “It is to turn a pleasant prospect at the north end of the town into something which is not defined,” he declared.

The day-long enquiry concerned a proposed amendment by Kincardine County Council to their development plan at the north side of Stonehaven to allow ground at Cowie Park to be used for a motel.

The objectors, who included two local hoteliers, public-house owners, garage proprietors, and residents, contended that the motel would create an added hazrd in an already congested area close to the town’s recreational facilities, and would also spoil Stonehaven’s amenity.

It was also conteded that there were ample hotel and boarding-house facilities in Stonehaven for the number of visitors, and that the motel affect their business.

On behalf of the county council, Mr Gordon Wood, depute county clerk, said the motel would bring benefit to the area as a whole. “It will create the impression that Stonehaven is a forward-looking town”.

100 YEARS AGO

Thursday March 8th, 1917

A public meeting of the ratepayers of Laurencekirk was held in the Town Hall on Monday evening, when it was unanimously resolved to form a Ratepayers’ Association for the Burgh.

It was further agreed to take steps to present to the Town Council a petition couched in the following terms: - We, the undersigned ratepayers of Laurencekirk, beg to express our strong disapproval of the present system adopted by Laurencekirk Town Council of discussing important items of public business at private meetings, whereby the ratepayers are deprived not only of the knowledge that such questions are being dealt with, but also of the opinions of their elected representatives of such questions.

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A very considerable fall of snow occurred over the weekend in the Mearns, and the fall has continued at intervals right up to the time of writing (Wednesday).

Snow is lying thick on the hills, and even on the lower ground there is a thick white mantle. Altogether the aspect is very wintry.

The change in the weather conditions is particularly disappointing for agriculturalists, as ploughing and other farm work, which was going on apace before the break-down, is already so much in arrears that any fresh delays are serious.