It Happened in the Mearns

This weeks Picture from the Past comes from the Leader archive of April 1992.
It shows Portlethen Cub Scouts, with Hamish Reid, John Doig and Philip Snodgrass in the foreground, proudly displaying their Adventure Crest certificates, the highest award achievable in the movement.
This weeks Picture from the Past comes from the Leader archive of April 1992. It shows Portlethen Cub Scouts, with Hamish Reid, John Doig and Philip Snodgrass in the foreground, proudly displaying their Adventure Crest certificates, the highest award achievable in the movement.

We take a look back at what was making the headlines locally on this week in 1992, 1967 and 1917.

25 YEARS AGO

Friday April 24th, 1992

Local community and District Councillors agreed last week to oppose plans by BT to move a telephone kiosk in Stonehaven.

The plan to move the telephone box in Cowie Village - at the corner of Boatie Row and Amy Row - first surfaced at last Tuesday’s community council meeting in the Town Hall, when secretary Mrs Helen Rzechorzek said that although BT had written agreeing to move the kiosk to a point just South of the outdoor swimming pool, this wasn’t what was wanted. BT had pointed out that the Cowie box wasn’t used often.

Mrs Rzechorzek said an entirely new box near to the Recreation Grounds was what they had asked for. She believed that, prior to the by-pass being opened, a phone booth was removed from that vicinity because of traffic problems caused by lorry drivers parking to make use of it.

A suggestion that a new kiosk from the rival company Mercury Communications should be sought, was put forward by Cllr. James Russell.

Local District Cllr Mrs Doreen Ewing said that what they wanted was a kiosk situated at the Beach Road junction with the main road, opposite Baird Park. There was plenty of parking space there. She criticised the BT plan to move the public telephone from Cowie Village, which would leave no ready phone nearby for emergency calls.

50 YEARS AGO

Friday April 28th, 1967

Each year we publish stories of young people who have lost their lives in the quest for gull’s eggs along our Kincardineshire coast.

In fact, as Chief Constable Tom Chasser informs us, seven persons were killed and many injured as a result of accidents which occurred during the nesting season on the cliffs at Cove Bay and Cove is not the only danger spot in the Mearns.

Almost the entire coastline has cliffs and where there are cliffs there is the temptation to young folks to seek the eggs of nesting birds.

Parents have a duty to warn their children about the dangers inherent in this practice and we have no doubt most of them do so, but there are exceptions.

Many young people, however, give no inkling of their intentions to look for eggs when they leave home. In fact, many of them do not even intend to do so, but a sudden impulse may take them into danger.

The problem is a most difficult one, especially as parental warnings may well act as a spur to the youngsters instead of a deterrent. In order to try and stem this needless loss of lives, we would ask parents to start their warnings now, before the danger season is actually with us, and so perhaps make a real contribution to safety.

100 YEARS AGO

Thursday April 26th, 1917

Our town and district has, like other parts, had to bear its brunt of the severe fighting which has been taking place on the Western front.

Every day brings its toll of local men who have been killed or wounded in the strife. Such things must be until the Huns have been finally defeated, and it would be unlike any of the Kincardineshire lads to shirk the position of danger.

In the case of those who have given their young lives for their country, it is a solemn duty on those they died to save to keep their memory green and their fame unfaded.

***

As one goes about through the district one is frequently coming across fresh instances of women’s war work, often in the most unexpected places.

It is understood that a number of local women are now in regular employment at a local tanning yard, where they are giving every satisfaction. Owing to the scarcity of keepers a head gamekeeper not a hundred miles from Stonehaven has been employing women in heather burning operations, very successfully, as it has turned out.

On going into a country smiddy the other day I was surprised to see the smith’s wife wielding the “fore hammer” with an ability that would have done credit to an apprentice with many years of his time in.