Friends of Carronhill donation

Craig Thomson who attends Carronhill School and is the son of Alison Thomson, chair of the Friends of  Carronhill.
Craig Thomson who attends Carronhill School and is the son of Alison Thomson, chair of the Friends of Carronhill.

Money raised by Simmons and Company International’s Sportschallenge event has allowed a charity to buy bikes for children with special needs.

Funds will also go towards setting up a network of trained cardiac responders in the region.

Sportschallenge 2015 raised more than £70,000, which has now been split between three north-east charities: Friends of Carronhill, The Sandpiper Trust and Maggie’s Aberdeen. Children’s Aid (Scotland) Ltd also received funds from the question of sport style event.

Friends of Carronhill support the little extras that make all the difference to the children who attend Carronhill School in Stonehaven.

The school is one of only three in the north-east, which caters for children from ages five to 18 with special needs, ranging from behavioural challenges such as Autism to physical difficulties such as Cerebral Palsy and Spina Bifida.

With the money they have received, Friends of Carronhill plan to purchase bikes for the school.

Alison Thomson, chair of the Friends of Carronhill, said: “Friends of Carronhill is run by parents of pupils who attend the school, so at the heart of everything we do are the needs of our children. We are completely overwhelmed by the money we have received from Sportschallenge. The support has been absolutely fantastic.

“Because of their complex needs and the fact that they need specialised equipment, some of the children at the school have never had the opportunity to ride a bike, so being able to purchase them is absolutely incredible. I know that having access to this equipment will be brilliant for the children; it will do so much for their confidence and will have a massive impact on their lives.”

Money raised by Sportschallenge will go towards the Sandpiper Trust’s Wildcat campaign, aiming to raise £750,000 to create a network of trained cardiac responders across the local area.

The Sandpiper Trust was set up in memory of 14-year-old Sandy Dickson who died in an accident in 2000. The charity aims to save lives in rural Scotland by equipping trained emergency volunteer responders with Sandpiper bags. These bags contain emergency medical equipment required to save lives.