Brian Eddie is double British Open champion

Brian Eddie
Brian Eddie

Brian Eddie of Dunnottar Quoiting Club became British Open champion for the second time as he beat off competition from a 26-man field to win the tournament.

Brian won in 2014 in Stonehaven and, now aged 28, remains the youngest player to have ever won the tournament - and the only ever Scot to do so.

This year, the British Open Quoiting Championship was held in Saron, Wales.

Players from Scotland, England and Wales participated in the event, which is the most prestigious in the quoiting calendar.

Wales has produced most of the winners in the championship’s history and produced the majority of the 26-man field – so winning on Welsh soil made this victory even more special than the first.

Champion Brian and quarter finalist Andrew Eddie were two of only three Scots making the journey down - their father Graeme was the third, and was “well beaten” in the opening round.

Andrew and Brian from Dunnottar Quoiting Club both reached the quarter finals, where Andrew lost to last year’s British Champion, Welshman Eirig Jones.

Brian went on to win his quarter final against Oliver Abbot from England.

In a tense semi-final, Brian played Eirig and with the score 20-19 in Eirig’s favour, Brian was holding shot and had a quoit to win the tie only for the quoit to bounce off the pin.

With the score 20 all, another end was needed. Brian held his nerve and threw an excellent quoit on top of the pin to win the game 21-20.

The other semi-final was an all-Welsh encounter where Dorian Thomas beat multiple British Champion Emyr Edwards.

In the final Brian started well and built a small lead only for Dorian to take the lead 19-14.

At the next end, Dorian was lying two shots with a quoit at either side of the pin. Brian’s last quoit split the two welsh quoits and nestled on the pin scoring one to make the score 19-15.

This was the turning point of the match and Brian went on to win the game 25-20 to become British Champion for the second time. Brian is the only Scottish player to have won this title, winning previously in 2014.

Next year, the championship will be held at Holbrook in Suffolk.

For those less certain on the sport Graeme Eddie, secretary of Dunnottar Quoiting Club - the only remaining quoiting club playing the game as it was originally known in Scotland - explained: “Basically we throw two metal rings called quoits from end to end into a bed of clay with a pin in the centre of it.

“This pin is flush with the top of the clay and that is the target. You throw 18 yards from end to end.

“The aim is to get your quoit as near to the pin as possible - the maximum you will score is two per end and the minimum one.”

Graeme and his two sons became involved in the sport through his uncle, with Graeme admitting his sons have become the better players.